The Basic Income for the Arts (BIA) is a pilot research programme. It was developed as a randomised control trial that consists of two groups of randomly selected people: one which is receiving the basic income payment, and a control group which is not.
The main element of this randomised control trial is a longitudinal survey that both groups complete every six months, the results of which are continuously analysed for the duration of the pilot, based on the comparison of averages between the responses of these two groups.

It was found that during the first six months of the pilot:

-Each week, BIA recipients spend one and a half hours more on research and experimentation, one hour more on management and administration, and one hour more presenting to audiences compared to the control group, i.e. 3.5 additional hours on their creative practice per week.
-BIA recipients decreased the weekly amount of time spent working in another sector by 3 hours compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients are 12 percentage points more likely than the control group to be able to sustain themselves through arts work alone.
-Life satisfaction, measured on a scale of one to ten, increased by more than half a point for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-Depression and anxiety experienced in the previous 4 weeks decreased by almost 10 percentage points for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients were 3.6 percentage points less likely to have felt depr essed or anxious “all of the time” compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients were 19.2 percentage points less likely to have difficulty making ends meet compared to the control group.
-The Enforced Deprivation Rate, as measured by the CSO, declined by 18.5 percentage points for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients experienced a decline in material deprivation across all 11 SILC indicators, ranging from -3 percentage points to -19 percentage points.
-BIA recipients spent each month €353 more on equipment and materials, €18 more on advertising and marketing, €34 more on work spaces, and €24 more on work travel compared to the control group.

Read the full report here