Studies – Arts & Culture

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Success, Security and Support – Cultural Freelancers Wales – November 2023

Success, Security and Support – Cultural Freelancers Wales – November 2023

Following in the footsteps of our much needed 2020 report (‘Rebalancing and Reimagining’) and its 2021 follow-up (‘Road to Recovery?’) we once again set out to survey the landscape of cultural freelancers in Wales. Our aim was to find out more about the demographics of our freelancers and to explore experiences and perspectives of their profession in 2023. The following pages summaries the responses from the Freelance Check-In survey. It provides a snap-shot of the workforce, its resilience, and its concerns.

  • 60% of cultural freelance work took place in Wales
  • One in four freelancers still do not know whether they will stay or leave the industry
  • 50% had seen a downturn in the amount of work they do
  • Half of all freelancers would not be able to pay three months’ expenses using their savings, highlighting the financial precarity in the sector
  • 71% of freelancers feel unsupported in the culture sector
  • Brexit has left freelancers with fewer opportunities, less money, and more hassle

Read the full report here

London’s Creative Industries: Sector deep dive – November 2023

London’s Creative Industries: Sector deep dive – November 2023

The report “London’s creative industries – sector deep dive” uses the definitions of the creative industries developed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) to provide an updated analysis of the sector in London. It draws on a variety of sources to assess performance trends over the past decade.

Among the key findings:

In 2021, there were some 94,900 filled jobs in music, performing and visual arts held in London – representing an 11.9% share of all creative industry jobs in the capital. The subsector was also notable for its prevalence of self-employment, which made up 60.4% of its jobs.

In 2021, more than a quarter of all creative industries jobs in London were held by self-employed workers, nearly twice the rate seen in non-creative sectors. However, the growth in self-employment has slowed in recent years and decreased following the pandemic.

Read the full report here

CREATIVES IN CRISIS

CREATIVES IN CRISIS

Creatives in Crisis is a research project which aims to explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on creative freelancers, and to look at how freelancers are mobilising online communities in response.

Creatives in Crisis is a research project which aims to explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on creative freelancers, and to look at how freelancers are mobilising online communities in response.

The project is led by Dr Holly Patrick of Edinburgh Napier University and is funded by the Creative Informatics research and development programme.

Making the Creative Majority – October 2023

Making the Creative Majority – October 2023

Making the Creative Majority: An APPG for Creative Diversity report on ‘What Works’ to support diversity and inclusion in creative education and the talent pipeline, with a focus on the 16+ age category.

The Creative Majority report is the culmination of a collaborative research project, commissioned by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Creative Diversity. It represents a partnership between the APPG Creative Diversity with King’s College London, University of the Arts London, University of Manchester and the Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre (Creative PEC), with support from YouTube and Paul Hamlyn Foundation

‘Making the Creative Majority’ analyses ‘What Works’ to support equity, diversity and inclusion in creative education and identifies critical points for intervention for the creative industries, education providers and policymakers to ensure the UK’s creative industries are inclusive and equitable.

The report provides a comprehensive understanding of the efficacy of current creative Higher Education (HE) pathways, and indicates key recommendations for the UK Government and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to improve diversity and inclusion in the UK’s creative higher education.

Read the full report here

The Musicians’ Census – September 2023

The Musicians’ Census – September 2023

The initial findings of the first ever UK Musicians’ Census are being released to the public by Help Musicians and the Musicians’ Union. The results are based on information provided by close to 6,000 musicians, making it the largest ever survey of its kind.

The first report provides a detailed insight into the demographic makeup of UK musicians, the barriers to career progression and economic challenges.

It reveals:

  • UK musicians’ average annual income from music work is £20,700 – but nearly half earn under £14,000
  • Over half of musicians need to sustain their career by sourcing other forms of income outside of the industry
  • Nearly half (44%) report a lack of sustainable income is a barrier to their music career.

Read the full report here

Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry (Ireland) 2022 – August 2023

Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry (Ireland) 2022 – August 2023

The Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry 2022 found the average weekly earnings in the arts and entertainment sector in Ireland in the last quarter of 2022 was €582.36, equating to 65% of the average (€900.26) for employees across all sectors.

This represented a drop of 1.8% when compared to average weekly earnings from the last quarter of 2021. Across Ireland, three of nine sectors reported a drop in average weekly earnings, with the arts and entertainment experiencing the steepest. In comparison, public sector workers saw an increase of 10.8% in their wages, while private sector workers had an average increase of 2%.

Read the full report here

‘Not here to help’ – Equity members’ experiences of Universal Credit and the Minimum Income Floor – July 2023

‘Not here to help’ – Equity members’ experiences of Universal Credit and the Minimum Income Floor – July 2023

This report uses new data from a survey of 674 Equity members, alongside six focused interviews, to analyse the experiences of social security of those working in the cultural and creative industries. On the basis of this analysis, it makes two recommendations for reform, to better support a workforce which directly generates £28.3bn in turnover and £13.5bn in Gross Value Added annually within the creative industries, which overall make up nearly 6% of the UK economy.

Read the full report here

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

The State of Creativity reflects on creative industry policy over the last 10 years and asks where next for the creative sector. It includes contributions from 24 creative industry thinkers from seven UK universities and across the creative sector. In the report, researchers highlight the priority areas for creative industries policy, and research. These short essays are supported by on-the-ground case studies from those working in the creative sector, including Syima Aslam from Bradford Literature Festival, entrepreneur Tom Adeyoola, and the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Sarah Ellis.

The report suggests that priority areas for creative industry policymakers over the coming years include the need to focus on creative education in schools and universities, ending unequal access to the arts and the regenerative power of the creative sector, if the UK is to fully realise the potential of its world-leading creative industries.

Read the full report here

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

The Cultural Recovery Fund (CRF) stopped hundreds of culture organisations from going under and supported almost 220,000 sector jobs, according to an independent evaluation into the scheme.

The £1.57 billion package – delivered across three rounds to cultural and heritage organisations at risk of insolvency due to the adverse effects of the pandemic – was shared between 4,473 cultural sector organisations.

Research consultancy Ecorys’ full report states organisations in receipt of CRF supported over 110,000 full-time jobs during 2020, alongside almost 108,000 contractors and freelancers.

Read the full report here