Studies – Arts & Culture

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Cultural Learning Alliance annual Report Card 2024

Cultural Learning Alliance annual Report Card 2024

CLA has regularly gathered data on arts GCSE and A-Level take up, and on arts teaching hours, but this is the first time that key arts education data (2010-2023) has been comprehensively gathered together in one place. We are expanding our reporting across five new key indicators to provide a detailed survey of children’s and young people’s access to the Arts through their schooling in England.

We now have a very clear view of what has been happening to Expressive Arts education in state schools over the past 14 years – since the introduction of the EBacc – and it is a stark picture of erosion and inequality.

Findings include:

  • There has been an overall decline of 42% in the number of Arts GCSE entries since 2010
  • In 2009/10, 14% of all GCSE entries were in Arts subjects; by 2022/23 the figure had halved (7%)
  • There are schools which no longer offer some Arts subjects at all at GCSE level: 42% of schools no longer enter any pupils for Music GCSE; 41% of schools no longer enter any pupils for Drama GCSE; and 84% enter no pupils for Dance GCSE
  • There has been an overall 21% decrease in Arts entries at A-Level since 2010

Read the full report here

Balancing Act: Take Two – PiPA 2024

Balancing Act: Take Two – PiPA 2024

New report highlights unsustainable conditions and devastating dilemmas for parents, carers and the wider workforce:
•Parents and carers pay penalty has more than doubled to £7,000 (since 2018) compared to workers without caring responsibilities
•Eight out of ten women working in the arts had to cut down working hours to manage caring responsibilities
•Two-thirds of freelance performing arts workers say that having a child would limit their careers
•Women and freelancers face the brunt of unpredictable, precarious and unsustainable working conditions
The second edition of the Parents and Carers in Performing Arts (PiPA) benchmark survey Balancing Act: Take Two reveals a concerning deterioration in conditions for parents and carers within the performing arts sector.
Report -Keeping the UK’s creative industries globally competitive – May 2024

Report -Keeping the UK’s creative industries globally competitive – May 2024

A new report by Erskine Analysis, in collaboration with University of the Arts London, highlights the critical role of the UK’s Creative Industries as an economic powerhouse. However, the report also identifies challenges that threaten the UK’s global leadership in this sector.

Despite demonstrably leading in every sub-sector, the report warns that the UK’s global position is under threat. From fashion to film, music to museums between 2010 and 2019 (pre-pandemic) the creative sector grew 60% faster than the wider economy. Yet, emerging data and industry insights suggest a need for strategic action to ensure continued growth and solidify the creative industries’ role in supporting the UK’s soft power and foreign policy goals.

By not taking action, the UK risks self-inflicted economic and diplomatic damage. The nation’s creative output fuels a powerful brand – a key tool for foreign policy. However, creative goods and services exports haven’t fully bounced back from the pandemic. Additionally, competitors like France, Canada, and South Korea are actively supporting their creative sectors with well-defined strategies.

This neglect in the UK is felt by creative businesses, who are calling for a more prominent role in trade, migration, and foreign policy discussions. They believe urgent measures are needed to boost exports and solidify the UK’s soft power advantage.

The report makes a number of recommendations. Five of the most critical are:

The introduction of a Soft Power Council chaired by the Foreign Secretary. Made up of artists, organisations and businesses who represent the diversity of emerging and established British talent.
The creation of a new Soft Power Unit sitting at the heart of the UK Government in the Cabinet Office, bringing together the resources from a number of disempowered, smaller teams which already operate across Whitehall;
A £50m digitisation fund for the BBC World Service. As one of the most globally familiar creative industries’ brands, it would allow the UK to reflect British values around the world and tackle global disinformation in the digital age;
The introduction of a visa for the world’s best designers and craftspeople;
A live calendar of creative trade opportunities delivered by the Department for Business and Trade.

Read the full report here.

UK Arts, Culture and Heritage Audiences + Workforce – Creative Industries PEC – May 2024

UK Arts, Culture and Heritage Audiences + Workforce – Creative Industries PEC – May 2024

The Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre’s (Creative PEC) latest report, Arts, Culture and Heritage: Audiences and Workforce, published today, is the first to use census data from 2021 to document the demographics of the sector’s workforce.

The research found 90% of people working across arts, culture and heritage are white, compared with 85% the general workforce figure.

The Creative PEC’s ‘State of the Nations’ series analyses the latest data across four thematic areas to inform the development of policies relating to the creative industries. Their scope is the whole of the United Kingdom, and wherever possible data is presented for all the nations and regions.

Read the full report here.

Let’s Create: Opera and Music Theatre Analysis – March 2024

Let’s Create: Opera and Music Theatre Analysis – March 2024

The brief for the project asked us to look at opera and music theatre, with a focus on England, though acknowledging the work of some organisations who undertake activity beyond this geographic focus. The study involved four areas of research:
1. A brief literature review of existing material, focusing on material which helped contextualise or interpret the other areas of data.
2. Data collection and analysis from a range of largely quantitative sources, including a mapping of opera and music theatre organisations in England, data on audiences and participants, and charity commission accounts for organisations in the sector.
3. Engagement with stakeholders through interviews and focus groups, including opera and music theatre organisations regularly funded by Arts Council England, organisations not in receipt of regular funding, venues receiving touring opera and music theatre, freelancers including singers, directors, creative designers and producers.2
4. Case studies of practice outside England, focusing on three themes: co-creation, partnership working, and approaches to developing new work.
Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 – March 2024

Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 – March 2024

This project examines the lessons learned from how governmental, charity, and informal support for organisations and workers in the performing arts across the G7, especially the UK, Germany, USA, and Canada, impacted the workforce, the type of outputs produced, and the resilience of the industry.

This report is complementary to the Summary Report of Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 published by the British Academy in March 2024. These examine the lessons learned from the responses of the live performing arts sector and governments to COVID-19 in each of the G7 countries. Our aim is to offer understanding that can be used to improve sector resilience to future crises, whether caused by new pandemics, climate-related disasters, demographic changes, economic pressures or national and international politics.

Read the report here.

The class ceiling in the creative industries. 26 March 2024

The class ceiling in the creative industries. 26 March 2024

Social enterprise Creative Access & PR firm FleishmanHillard UK reveal new findings on class ceiling within creative industries.

Creative Access, a leading UK diversity & inclusion social enterprise, unveils startling research on working-class experiences in the UK’s creative sector today. In speaking to professionals from all class groups across the creative industries, findings reveal 70% believe that ‘soft’ social identifiers of class – such as where an individual went to school and your level of confidence – still affect how peers in creative industries see one another, and that class discrimination is still an issue in the workplace today.

  • Most creative industry professionals agree working class representation is lacking most at senior level (according to 73% of working-class individuals and 46% of upper/upper middle individuals)
  • 74% agree it is harder for working-class people to land a role in the creative industries
  • 70% of respondents say your class affects how you’re seen by your peers

Read the full report here.

Culture, Climate and Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/23

Culture, Climate and Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/23

Each year, The Arts Council team up with Julie’s Bicycle to produce our Environmental Responsibility Annual Report, which celebrates the successes of creative and cultural organisations in acting on national and international climate targets.

Report highlights include:

  • 94% of organisations include environmental sustainability in core business strategies
  • 60% of our portfolio include environmental sustainability in their artistic/production briefs and open calls
  • 20% reduction in energy use across the portfolio from 2018/19 to 22/23
  • Ten-year downward trend – the average emissions reported per organisation have reduced by 50% since environmental reporting began in
  • 2012 (indicative using various assumptions).

Read the full report here.

Balancing Act: Take Two – PiPA 2024

Identity Crisis and Talent Loss: Impacts of Pregnancy and Caring Responsibilities on Freelance Mothers in Dance – PiPA

Funded by Dance Professionals Fund and conducted by Professor Angela Pickard, Canterbury Christ Church University, this qualitative study was based on focus groups and interviews with 40 freelance dancers and dance artists from different backgrounds and styles within the contemporary dance sector, working for established as well as smaller scale dance companies.

The report highlights the key findings of the PiPA study and builds on existing initiatives. It examines the physical and psychological challenges, particularly faced by freelance dance professionals who are mothers, affecting their career development, their sense of identity, and personal well-being.

Read the report here.