Studies – Arts & Culture

Published in date order Most recent first
At risk: our creative future – The Communications and Digital Committee – January 2023

At risk: our creative future – The Communications and Digital Committee – January 2023

The House of Lords Communications Committee warns that Government complacency risks undermining the UK’s creative industries in the face of increased international competition and rapid technological change.

In a report published today, the Committee says that the UK’s creative industries should sit at the heart of the UK’s economic growth plans. But the Committee sounds the alarm over missed opportunities and a failure among senior Government figures to recognise the sector’s commercial potential.

The UK’s creative industries were worth more than £115bn to the UK economy before the pandemic, and make up as many as one in eight businesses across the country. Their contribution to the economy in 2019 was more than the aerospace, life sciences and automotive industries combined. The sector also delivers higher levels of innovation than many other areas of the economy.

Read the full report here

Stage Directors 2023 Census – January 2023

Stage Directors 2023 Census – January 2023

The journey of this census has been eventful. Have we asked every pertinent question? No. Pertinence has shifted throughout the process, and we have tried to adapt along the way.

SDUK (Stage Directors UK) began this journey with the desire to understand where the stage directing profession is in a nearly post-Covid 19 world. The participants included members of SDUK and non-members; this is not a survey of SDUK members but of the profession as a whole.

The data we have gathered is an essential tool to help us understand the questions which need to be asked, the provocations which need to be launched, and the support which needs to be provided. 523 directors participated in the census.

We would like to extend our gratitude to all who participated in the census, and we hope that the results will be a useful tool in creating a safer, more equitable and healthier U.K. theatre.

Read the full census here.

CREATIVE MAJORITY: An APPG for Creative Diversity report on ‘What Works’ to support, encourage and improve equity, diversity and inclusion in the creative sector.

CREATIVE MAJORITY: An APPG for Creative Diversity report on ‘What Works’ to support, encourage and improve equity, diversity and inclusion in the creative sector.

The Creative Majority  report is the culmination of a collaborative research project, commissioned by the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Creative Diversity. It represents a partnership between the APPG Creative Diversity chaired by Baroness Deborah Bull and Labour MP Chi Onwurah with King’s College London and The University of Edinburgh, alongside support from the Paul Hamlyn Foundation and NBCUniversal. The partners have worked together to address the question of workforce equity in the creative and cultural sector. Much has been written about inequality in this workforce, with extensive evidence already demonstrating the barriers to employment and leadership opportunities across the industry. The Creative Majority  report addresses this issue through a ‘What Works’ approach. It aimed to understand what has worked to improve equity in the creative and cultural sectors, and what can be learned from other sectors to transform the creative labour forces of the future.

Read the full report here

Pulse report: ArtsPay 2022

Pulse report: ArtsPay 2022

Periodically, Arts Professional undertakes Pulse research to gather important data about the arts and culture sector.

This latest Pulse research – ArtsPay 2022 – comes at an important moment. Unlike the previous survey run in 2018, these results are published at a time of rising inflation and during significant ongoing pandemic-related challenges. Both are affecting the spending power of individuals and organisations alike.

Two pictures emerge from this research.

The first comes from the hard numbers relating to pay. These show salaries largely keeping pace with national averages, and progress on gender pay gaps and pay differentials. Where there are departures from these headlines, we have highlighted them. But overall, the numbers tell a story that, even if not overwhelmingly positive, isn’t particularly negative.

The second picture emerges from the personal stories respondents shared, away from the checkboxes and drop-down menus, reaching into areas of compensation beyond headline pay. They are stories of struggle, inequities, challenges in career progression, insecurity and precarity, poor terms and conditions, insidiously eroded hope and more than a little despair. They reveal a strong sense of injustice and provide context for understanding the talent drain which has undoubtedly affected the arts and culture sector post-pandemic.

Read the full report here.

Better data on the cultural economy: scoping study (DCMS May 2022 study)

Better data on the cultural economy: scoping study (DCMS May 2022 study)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) exposed the need for the government to have access to better data about the cultural economy.

This study was commissioned by DCMS to develop an understanding of possible ways forward to strengthen data on the cultural sector to better understand its value and contribution to the UK economy and society, which would, in turn, enable more effective policy development.

Responsibility for data on the cultural economy is shared among a whole array of data holders within and outside the sector (such as cultural organisations or arm’s-length bodies and regulators or funders) as well as other parts of government (such as the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport, the Office for National Statistics or Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs).

The report sets out a number of short, medium and longer term recommendations, for relevant stakeholders to progress discussions on how to create a better evidence base for England’s cultural economy in a collaborative way.

Download the study here.

Digital Access to Arts and Culture

Digital Access to Arts and Culture

‘Digital Access to Arts and Culture’ is the first major UK research project dedicated to investigating the accessibility and inclusion implications of the rapid growth in online arts and culture during the pandemic.

The final report summarises an 18-month research project into the role of digital arts and culture in the UK during the pandemic, focusing on its accessibility implications.

The report pays particular attention to the ‘pivot’ to online programming undertaken by many arts and culture organisations following the onset of COVID-19. It also explores how online and live programmes have interacted with each other, how digital accessibility tools are finding their way back into in-person activities, and what the wider accessibility implications of the on-going hybridisation of arts and culture may be. 

Read the report here.

Equality and Diversity in Concert Halls – 100 Orchestras Worldwide – DONNE

Equality and Diversity in Concert Halls – 100 Orchestras Worldwide – DONNE

This latest research by Donne – Women in Music has been prepared to get a better understanding of how classical music is responding to the current and very important issue of equality and diversityin concert’s repertoire worldwide. It builds on previous research carried out in 2018/2019 and 2019/2020.

The new results presented here were determined by in-depth analysis of composers’ works scheduled for the 2020-2021 season in 100 orchestras from 27 countries.The results show thatonly 11.45% of the scheduled concerts worldwide included compositions by women. 88.55% included solely compositions written by men.

Read the report here.

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion data report – Arts Council England (2022)

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion data report – Arts Council England (2022)

This report features data on:

• The diversity of applicants for assistance from our own Emergency Response Fund and the UK Government’s Culture Recovery Fund

• The workforce of those organisations that make up our current National Portfolio, including the diversity of people at different job levels and governance, and overall figures of those working in the sector

• The diversity of those applying to National Lottery Grants and Developing Your Own Creative Practice

• The make-up of audiences from our National Portfolio Organisations

• Diversity within the Arts Council’s workforce, leadership, and our governance: our National and Area Councils

Read the report here.

Impact of COVID-19 on DCMS sectors: First Report

Impact of COVID-19 on DCMS sectors: First Report

The Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee is appointed by the House of Commons to examine the expenditure, administration and policy of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and its associated public bodies

Sport, culture and tourism all operate to some extent by bringing people together for shared experiences. All have been hit hard by the Covid-19 crisis. While this report focuses on sectors within the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s remit, it is important to remember that their difficulties will spill into the wider economy, and the health and wellbeing of the population as a whole

Read the report here.

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES – POLICY AND EVIDENCE CENTRE: Social mobility in the creative economy: Rebuilding and levelling up? – 9 September 2021

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES – POLICY AND EVIDENCE CENTRE: Social mobility in the creative economy: Rebuilding and levelling up? – 9 September 2021

This report concludes phase 2 of the PEC’s ‘Class in the Creative Industries’ programme. Led by PEC researchers at Work Advance, the University of Edinburgh, and the Work Foundation, and co-funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), the research provides definitive evidence on the causes of class imbalances and sets out an ambitious and wide-ranging programme of change to enhance social mobility into Creative roles.

Read the report here.