Studies – Arts & Culture

Published in date order Most recent first
Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

The State of Creativity reflects on creative industry policy over the last 10 years and asks where next for the creative sector. It includes contributions from 24 creative industry thinkers from seven UK universities and across the creative sector. In the report, researchers highlight the priority areas for creative industries policy, and research. These short essays are supported by on-the-ground case studies from those working in the creative sector, including Syima Aslam from Bradford Literature Festival, entrepreneur Tom Adeyoola, and the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Sarah Ellis.

The report suggests that priority areas for creative industry policymakers over the coming years include the need to focus on creative education in schools and universities, ending unequal access to the arts and the regenerative power of the creative sector, if the UK is to fully realise the potential of its world-leading creative industries.

Read the full report here

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

The Cultural Recovery Fund (CRF) stopped hundreds of culture organisations from going under and supported almost 220,000 sector jobs, according to an independent evaluation into the scheme.

The £1.57 billion package – delivered across three rounds to cultural and heritage organisations at risk of insolvency due to the adverse effects of the pandemic – was shared between 4,473 cultural sector organisations.

Research consultancy Ecorys’ full report states organisations in receipt of CRF supported over 110,000 full-time jobs during 2020, alongside almost 108,000 contractors and freelancers.

Read the full report here

The Arts in Schools: Foundations for the Future – March 2023

The Arts in Schools: Foundations for the Future – March 2023

This new report finds evidence of inspirational practice across the country, but also deep concern about the principles and provision underpinning the arts in schools today. It shows that progress isn’t always linear or lasting. In a context of financial crisis and profound societal change, arguments won in the 1980s must be championed again.

We hope the findings from this report will contribute to a reconsideration of the role and value of the arts in schools in the UK and, as with the original report, have relevance to similar debates in other countries and contexts, highlighting the need for greater and more equitable access for all.

Read the full report here

Cultured Communities – The Crisis Of Local Funding For Arts and Culture

Cultured Communities – The Crisis Of Local Funding For Arts and Culture

This report presents new research on the cuts to local government funding of arts and culture between 2009-10 and 2018-19. We have also analysed Arts Council England spending. The report also reviews the importance of arts and culture for local areas to boost recovery after coronavirus. Throughout the report, there are insights from Hull UK City of Culture 2017 and Waltham Forest London Borough of Culture 2019. The report makes recommendations on how national government and local government can place arts and culture at the heart of a post-Covid-19 recovery and ensure that every pound spent on arts and culture is used effectively.

Read the report here.

Structurally F*cked – an inquiry into artists’ pay and conditions in the public sector – March 2023

Structurally F*cked – an inquiry into artists’ pay and conditions in the public sector – March 2023

In 2020, Industria submitted a Freedom of Information Request to the Tate asking for information on their pay structures for artists. They responded that it was not in their ‘commercial interest’ to divulge this information. Troubled by this lack of transparency from an institution in receipt of significant state funding, we devised Artist Leaks as an attempt to uncover this information directly from artists themselves. We launched an open call on all our channels for artists to come forward and anonymously share with us their experiences of pay and conditions in publicly funded institutions and visual arts programmes in the UK.

This inquiry is based on that data collected between 2020 and early 2022.

Read the full report here

Culture Radar – Review of Fair Work in the creative and cultural sectors in Scotland – February 2023

Culture Radar – Review of Fair Work in the creative and cultural sectors in Scotland – February 2023

The Review took place between August 2021 and March 2022

Fair Work was launched by the Scottish Government in 2015. Its vision is for Scotland to be a leading Fair Work Nation by 2025 with its people having a worldleading working life where Fair Work drives success, wellbeing and prosperity for individuals, businesses, organisations and society.

A Culture Strategy for Scotland highlights strengthening culture as one of its key ambitions. To achieve this, Scottish Government committed to considering ways to support the cultural workforce, and continue work on making the culture sector part of Scotland as a Fair Work Nation. One of the actions underpinning this commitment was to undertake a status review of the cultural workforce.

To guide this process Creative Scotland commissioned Culture Radar to consider Fair Work, leadership, workforce, and skills development across the creative and cultural sectors. This work reviews the current status, with baseline findings from which further work and research can develop

Read the full report here

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

The Good Work Review – Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre – February 2023

The Good Work Review is the first examination of job quality across the entire creative industries. The Review is based on 40 separate indicators, from evidence submitted by 120 organisations, and focuses on issues including fair pay, flexible working, paid overtime and employee representation.

Following a call for evidence, 120 organisations from across the UK, and representing a wide range of creative sectors, contributed their expertise to the Review. These experts and creative representatives called for industry and government to invest in people, skills, diversity and well-being if the UK is to remain a creative powerhouse.

The Review also found that people working in the Creative Industries tended to have higher job satisfaction than workers in other sectors, could work more flexibly, and found their work to be an outlet for their creative passion.

However, the Review also found that there was lower than average pay in some sectors, long hours, evidence for poor workplace culture, and unequal access to the creative industries, with many people needing to work for free to get a foot in the door.

Read the full report here

Arts attendance in England October 2020 – September 2022

Arts attendance in England October 2020 – September 2022

The Participation survey is the new flagship survey by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).

It is designed to provide a central, reliable evidence source that can be used to analyse cultural, digital and sporting engagement of adults aged 16 and over in England.

Fieldwork involving over 8,000 people has been conducted quarterly since October 2021.

This report, published by Campaign for the Arts and Data Culture Change, analyses attendance at arts events using the first full year of Participation survey fieldwork (October 2021 to September 2022).

Read the full report here

At risk: our creative future – The Communications and Digital Committee – January 2023

At risk: our creative future – The Communications and Digital Committee – January 2023

The House of Lords Communications Committee warns that Government complacency risks undermining the UK’s creative industries in the face of increased international competition and rapid technological change.

In a report published today, the Committee says that the UK’s creative industries should sit at the heart of the UK’s economic growth plans. But the Committee sounds the alarm over missed opportunities and a failure among senior Government figures to recognise the sector’s commercial potential.

The UK’s creative industries were worth more than £115bn to the UK economy before the pandemic, and make up as many as one in eight businesses across the country. Their contribution to the economy in 2019 was more than the aerospace, life sciences and automotive industries combined. The sector also delivers higher levels of innovation than many other areas of the economy.

Read the full report here

Stage Directors 2023 Census – January 2023

Stage Directors 2023 Census – January 2023

The journey of this census has been eventful. Have we asked every pertinent question? No. Pertinence has shifted throughout the process, and we have tried to adapt along the way.

SDUK (Stage Directors UK) began this journey with the desire to understand where the stage directing profession is in a nearly post-Covid 19 world. The participants included members of SDUK and non-members; this is not a survey of SDUK members but of the profession as a whole.

The data we have gathered is an essential tool to help us understand the questions which need to be asked, the provocations which need to be launched, and the support which needs to be provided. 523 directors participated in the census.

We would like to extend our gratitude to all who participated in the census, and we hope that the results will be a useful tool in creating a safer, more equitable and healthier U.K. theatre.

Read the full census here.