Studies – Arts & Culture

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Cultural strategies and futures Report 2024 – University of Southampton

Cultural strategies and futures Report 2024 – University of Southampton

This report outlines findings and makes recommendations from the Public Policy Southampton funded project, Cultural strategies, compacts and futures: The role of local government in connecting culture with place, health and the environment. The project team of Professor Dan Ashton and Makanani Bell were based in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Southampton. The project was developed in partnership with the Southern Policy Centre and ran from January to June 2023.

This project aimed to understand how local government can effectively position culture in relation to priority issues such as place, health and the environment. As the project developed, a wider set of findings emerged exploring how cultural strategy documents are created, updated and shared. As such, the recommendations in this report focus on and suggest changes in the practice of commissioning and creating cultural strategies. The recommendations are relevant for any organisation (local authorities, culture trusts, Cultural Compacts, etc.) as they approach commissioning and creating cultural strategies and/or reflect on their continued purpose and value.

Read the report here

Arts Council England Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/2023

Arts Council England Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/2023

Arts Council England (ACE) publishes its Environmental Responsibility Annual Report 2022-2023, a publication which presents National Portfolio Organisations (NPO) environmental data and narratives for the period of 1 April 2022 – 31 March 2023.

Report highlights include: 

  • 94% of funded organisations include environmental sustainability in core business strategies
  • 74% have programmed or produced work exploring environmental themes
  • Overall, there has been a 20% reduction in energy use across the portfolio over the last five years, and a 50% emissions reduction since reporting began in 2012.

Read the report here.

Seat at the Table 2024 Report – Women in ctrl – Feb 2024

Seat at the Table 2024 Report – Women in ctrl – Feb 2024

Historic News in the Music Industry! The ‘Seat at the Table 2024’ report is out now, marking a significant milestone with 52% representation of women on UK music trade body boards. Let’s celebrate progress and keep driving positive change together! #SeatAtTheTable

Key Findings:
52% of board members across UK music trade bodies are women, up from 32% in 2020.
16% of board members are women from a global majority background, up from 3% in 2020.
100% of the organisations featured have increased gender representation on their boards.
Over 55% of organisations have achieved 50% gender representation on their boards.

Read it here

Culture and creative industries: A catalyst for inclusive growth

Culture and creative industries: A catalyst for inclusive growth

Culture and creative industries have significant economic heft, contributing £160bn to the economy with 3.2 million jobs. The UK’s status as one of the top 5 exporters of creative services globally is central to its position on the world stage. Beyond this, culture plays a vital role in our day-to-day lives, shaping who we are as individuals and communities, and contributing to our wellbeing and pride in place. While many of our most internationally recognised cultural institutions are in the UK’s capital and other major cities, the social and economic impact of culture is everywhere.

Our framework sets out how culture and creative industries can catalyse inclusive growth. It includes three intersecting inclusive growth drivers and four enablers for making positive change happen.

Read the report here.

Misogyny in music – Women and Equalities Committee – Jan 2024

Misogyny in music – Women and Equalities Committee – Jan 2024

Women working in the music industry face limitations in opportunity, a lack of support, gender discrimination and sexual harassment and assault as well as the persistent issue of unequal pay in a sector dominated by self-employment and gendered power imbalances. Despite increases in representation, these issues are endemic and are intensified for women faced with intersectional barriers, particularly racial discrimination.

There are legislative steps the Government can take to help tackle some of these concerns. The Equality Act should be amended to ensure freelance workers are provided with the same protections from discrimination as employees, section 14 of the Act should be brought into force to improve protections for people facing intersectional inequality. The Government should legislate to impose a duty on employers to protect workers from sexual harassment by third parties, a proposal the Government initially supported and then rejected last year.

Read the full report here.

Basic Income for the Arts (Ireland) – Initial Impact Assessment (6-month) -Dec 2023

Basic Income for the Arts (Ireland) – Initial Impact Assessment (6-month) -Dec 2023

The Basic Income for the Arts (BIA) is a pilot research programme. It was developed as a randomised control trial that consists of two groups of randomly selected people: one which is receiving the basic income payment, and a control group which is not.
The main element of this randomised control trial is a longitudinal survey that both groups complete every six months, the results of which are continuously analysed for the duration of the pilot, based on the comparison of averages between the responses of these two groups.

It was found that during the first six months of the pilot:

-Each week, BIA recipients spend one and a half hours more on research and experimentation, one hour more on management and administration, and one hour more presenting to audiences compared to the control group, i.e. 3.5 additional hours on their creative practice per week.
-BIA recipients decreased the weekly amount of time spent working in another sector by 3 hours compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients are 12 percentage points more likely than the control group to be able to sustain themselves through arts work alone.
-Life satisfaction, measured on a scale of one to ten, increased by more than half a point for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-Depression and anxiety experienced in the previous 4 weeks decreased by almost 10 percentage points for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients were 3.6 percentage points less likely to have felt depr essed or anxious “all of the time” compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients were 19.2 percentage points less likely to have difficulty making ends meet compared to the control group.
-The Enforced Deprivation Rate, as measured by the CSO, declined by 18.5 percentage points for BIA recipients compared to the control group.
-BIA recipients experienced a decline in material deprivation across all 11 SILC indicators, ranging from -3 percentage points to -19 percentage points.
-BIA recipients spent each month €353 more on equipment and materials, €18 more on advertising and marketing, €34 more on work spaces, and €24 more on work travel compared to the control group.

Read the full report here

Success, Security and Support – Cultural Freelancers Wales – November 2023

Success, Security and Support – Cultural Freelancers Wales – November 2023

Following in the footsteps of our much needed 2020 report (‘Rebalancing and Reimagining’) and its 2021 follow-up (‘Road to Recovery?’) we once again set out to survey the landscape of cultural freelancers in Wales. Our aim was to find out more about the demographics of our freelancers and to explore experiences and perspectives of their profession in 2023. The following pages summaries the responses from the Freelance Check-In survey. It provides a snap-shot of the workforce, its resilience, and its concerns.

  • 60% of cultural freelance work took place in Wales
  • One in four freelancers still do not know whether they will stay or leave the industry
  • 50% had seen a downturn in the amount of work they do
  • Half of all freelancers would not be able to pay three months’ expenses using their savings, highlighting the financial precarity in the sector
  • 71% of freelancers feel unsupported in the culture sector
  • Brexit has left freelancers with fewer opportunities, less money, and more hassle

Read the full report here

London’s Creative Industries: Sector deep dive – November 2023

London’s Creative Industries: Sector deep dive – November 2023

The report “London’s creative industries – sector deep dive” uses the definitions of the creative industries developed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) to provide an updated analysis of the sector in London. It draws on a variety of sources to assess performance trends over the past decade.

Among the key findings:

In 2021, there were some 94,900 filled jobs in music, performing and visual arts held in London – representing an 11.9% share of all creative industry jobs in the capital. The subsector was also notable for its prevalence of self-employment, which made up 60.4% of its jobs.

In 2021, more than a quarter of all creative industries jobs in London were held by self-employed workers, nearly twice the rate seen in non-creative sectors. However, the growth in self-employment has slowed in recent years and decreased following the pandemic.

Read the full report here

CREATIVES IN CRISIS

CREATIVES IN CRISIS

Creatives in Crisis is a research project which aims to explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on creative freelancers, and to look at how freelancers are mobilising online communities in response.

Creatives in Crisis is a research project which aims to explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on creative freelancers, and to look at how freelancers are mobilising online communities in response.

The project is led by Dr Holly Patrick of Edinburgh Napier University and is funded by the Creative Informatics research and development programme.

Making the Creative Majority – October 2023

Making the Creative Majority – October 2023

Making the Creative Majority: An APPG for Creative Diversity report on ‘What Works’ to support diversity and inclusion in creative education and the talent pipeline, with a focus on the 16+ age category.

The Creative Majority report is the culmination of a collaborative research project, commissioned by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Creative Diversity. It represents a partnership between the APPG Creative Diversity with King’s College London, University of the Arts London, University of Manchester and the Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre (Creative PEC), with support from YouTube and Paul Hamlyn Foundation

‘Making the Creative Majority’ analyses ‘What Works’ to support equity, diversity and inclusion in creative education and identifies critical points for intervention for the creative industries, education providers and policymakers to ensure the UK’s creative industries are inclusive and equitable.

The report provides a comprehensive understanding of the efficacy of current creative Higher Education (HE) pathways, and indicates key recommendations for the UK Government and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to improve diversity and inclusion in the UK’s creative higher education.

Read the full report here