Studies – Arts & Culture

Published in date order Most recent first
The Musicians’ Census – September 2023

The Musicians’ Census – September 2023

The initial findings of the first ever UK Musicians’ Census are being released to the public by Help Musicians and the Musicians’ Union. The results are based on information provided by close to 6,000 musicians, making it the largest ever survey of its kind.

The first report provides a detailed insight into the demographic makeup of UK musicians, the barriers to career progression and economic challenges.

It reveals:

  • UK musicians’ average annual income from music work is £20,700 – but nearly half earn under £14,000
  • Over half of musicians need to sustain their career by sourcing other forms of income outside of the industry
  • Nearly half (44%) report a lack of sustainable income is a barrier to their music career.

Read the full report here

Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry (Ireland) 2022 – August 2023

Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry (Ireland) 2022 – August 2023

The Review of Pay and Conditions in the Performing Arts Sector and Music Industry 2022 found the average weekly earnings in the arts and entertainment sector in Ireland in the last quarter of 2022 was €582.36, equating to 65% of the average (€900.26) for employees across all sectors.

This represented a drop of 1.8% when compared to average weekly earnings from the last quarter of 2021. Across Ireland, three of nine sectors reported a drop in average weekly earnings, with the arts and entertainment experiencing the steepest. In comparison, public sector workers saw an increase of 10.8% in their wages, while private sector workers had an average increase of 2%.

Read the full report here

‘Not here to help’ – Equity members’ experiences of Universal Credit and the Minimum Income Floor – July 2023

‘Not here to help’ – Equity members’ experiences of Universal Credit and the Minimum Income Floor – July 2023

This report uses new data from a survey of 674 Equity members, alongside six focused interviews, to analyse the experiences of social security of those working in the cultural and creative industries. On the basis of this analysis, it makes two recommendations for reform, to better support a workforce which directly generates £28.3bn in turnover and £13.5bn in Gross Value Added annually within the creative industries, which overall make up nearly 6% of the UK economy.

Read the full report here

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

Creative Industries Policy & Evidence Centre – The State of Creativity – April 2023

The State of Creativity reflects on creative industry policy over the last 10 years and asks where next for the creative sector. It includes contributions from 24 creative industry thinkers from seven UK universities and across the creative sector. In the report, researchers highlight the priority areas for creative industries policy, and research. These short essays are supported by on-the-ground case studies from those working in the creative sector, including Syima Aslam from Bradford Literature Festival, entrepreneur Tom Adeyoola, and the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Sarah Ellis.

The report suggests that priority areas for creative industry policymakers over the coming years include the need to focus on creative education in schools and universities, ending unequal access to the arts and the regenerative power of the creative sector, if the UK is to fully realise the potential of its world-leading creative industries.

Read the full report here

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

Evaluation of the Cultural Recovery Fund – April 2023

The Cultural Recovery Fund (CRF) stopped hundreds of culture organisations from going under and supported almost 220,000 sector jobs, according to an independent evaluation into the scheme.

The £1.57 billion package – delivered across three rounds to cultural and heritage organisations at risk of insolvency due to the adverse effects of the pandemic – was shared between 4,473 cultural sector organisations.

Research consultancy Ecorys’ full report states organisations in receipt of CRF supported over 110,000 full-time jobs during 2020, alongside almost 108,000 contractors and freelancers.

Read the full report here

The Arts in Schools: Foundations for the Future – March 2023

The Arts in Schools: Foundations for the Future – March 2023

This new report finds evidence of inspirational practice across the country, but also deep concern about the principles and provision underpinning the arts in schools today. It shows that progress isn’t always linear or lasting. In a context of financial crisis and profound societal change, arguments won in the 1980s must be championed again.

We hope the findings from this report will contribute to a reconsideration of the role and value of the arts in schools in the UK and, as with the original report, have relevance to similar debates in other countries and contexts, highlighting the need for greater and more equitable access for all.

Read the full report here

Cultured Communities – The Crisis Of Local Funding For Arts and Culture

Cultured Communities – The Crisis Of Local Funding For Arts and Culture

This report presents new research on the cuts to local government funding of arts and culture between 2009-10 and 2018-19. We have also analysed Arts Council England spending. The report also reviews the importance of arts and culture for local areas to boost recovery after coronavirus. Throughout the report, there are insights from Hull UK City of Culture 2017 and Waltham Forest London Borough of Culture 2019. The report makes recommendations on how national government and local government can place arts and culture at the heart of a post-Covid-19 recovery and ensure that every pound spent on arts and culture is used effectively.

Read the report here.

Structurally F*cked – an inquiry into artists’ pay and conditions in the public sector – March 2023

Structurally F*cked – an inquiry into artists’ pay and conditions in the public sector – March 2023

In 2020, Industria submitted a Freedom of Information Request to the Tate asking for information on their pay structures for artists. They responded that it was not in their ‘commercial interest’ to divulge this information. Troubled by this lack of transparency from an institution in receipt of significant state funding, we devised Artist Leaks as an attempt to uncover this information directly from artists themselves. We launched an open call on all our channels for artists to come forward and anonymously share with us their experiences of pay and conditions in publicly funded institutions and visual arts programmes in the UK.

This inquiry is based on that data collected between 2020 and early 2022.

Read the full report here

Culture Radar – Review of Fair Work in the creative and cultural sectors in Scotland – February 2023

Culture Radar – Review of Fair Work in the creative and cultural sectors in Scotland – February 2023

The Review took place between August 2021 and March 2022

Fair Work was launched by the Scottish Government in 2015. Its vision is for Scotland to be a leading Fair Work Nation by 2025 with its people having a worldleading working life where Fair Work drives success, wellbeing and prosperity for individuals, businesses, organisations and society.

A Culture Strategy for Scotland highlights strengthening culture as one of its key ambitions. To achieve this, Scottish Government committed to considering ways to support the cultural workforce, and continue work on making the culture sector part of Scotland as a Fair Work Nation. One of the actions underpinning this commitment was to undertake a status review of the cultural workforce.

To guide this process Creative Scotland commissioned Culture Radar to consider Fair Work, leadership, workforce, and skills development across the creative and cultural sectors. This work reviews the current status, with baseline findings from which further work and research can develop

Read the full report here