Studies – Arts & Culture

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Let’s Create: Opera and Music Theatre Analysis – March 2024

Let’s Create: Opera and Music Theatre Analysis – March 2024

The brief for the project asked us to look at opera and music theatre, with a focus on England, though acknowledging the work of some organisations who undertake activity beyond this geographic focus. The study involved four areas of research:
1. A brief literature review of existing material, focusing on material which helped contextualise or interpret the other areas of data.
2. Data collection and analysis from a range of largely quantitative sources, including a mapping of opera and music theatre organisations in England, data on audiences and participants, and charity commission accounts for organisations in the sector.
3. Engagement with stakeholders through interviews and focus groups, including opera and music theatre organisations regularly funded by Arts Council England, organisations not in receipt of regular funding, venues receiving touring opera and music theatre, freelancers including singers, directors, creative designers and producers.2
4. Case studies of practice outside England, focusing on three themes: co-creation, partnership working, and approaches to developing new work.
Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 – March 2024

Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 – March 2024

This project examines the lessons learned from how governmental, charity, and informal support for organisations and workers in the performing arts across the G7, especially the UK, Germany, USA, and Canada, impacted the workforce, the type of outputs produced, and the resilience of the industry.

This report is complementary to the Summary Report of Pandemic Preparedness in the Live Performing Arts: Lessons to Learn from COVID-19 published by the British Academy in March 2024. These examine the lessons learned from the responses of the live performing arts sector and governments to COVID-19 in each of the G7 countries. Our aim is to offer understanding that can be used to improve sector resilience to future crises, whether caused by new pandemics, climate-related disasters, demographic changes, economic pressures or national and international politics.

Read the report here.

The class ceiling in the creative industries. 26 March 2024

The class ceiling in the creative industries. 26 March 2024

Social enterprise Creative Access & PR firm FleishmanHillard UK reveal new findings on class ceiling within creative industries.

Creative Access, a leading UK diversity & inclusion social enterprise, unveils startling research on working-class experiences in the UK’s creative sector today. In speaking to professionals from all class groups across the creative industries, findings reveal 70% believe that ‘soft’ social identifiers of class – such as where an individual went to school and your level of confidence – still affect how peers in creative industries see one another, and that class discrimination is still an issue in the workplace today.

  • Most creative industry professionals agree working class representation is lacking most at senior level (according to 73% of working-class individuals and 46% of upper/upper middle individuals)
  • 74% agree it is harder for working-class people to land a role in the creative industries
  • 70% of respondents say your class affects how you’re seen by your peers

Read the full report here.

Culture, Climate and Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/23

Culture, Climate and Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/23

Each year, The Arts Council team up with Julie’s Bicycle to produce our Environmental Responsibility Annual Report, which celebrates the successes of creative and cultural organisations in acting on national and international climate targets.

Report highlights include:

  • 94% of organisations include environmental sustainability in core business strategies
  • 60% of our portfolio include environmental sustainability in their artistic/production briefs and open calls
  • 20% reduction in energy use across the portfolio from 2018/19 to 22/23
  • Ten-year downward trend – the average emissions reported per organisation have reduced by 50% since environmental reporting began in
  • 2012 (indicative using various assumptions).

Read the full report here.

Identity Crisis and Talent Loss: Impacts of Pregnancy and Caring Responsibilities on Freelance Mothers in Dance – PiPA

Identity Crisis and Talent Loss: Impacts of Pregnancy and Caring Responsibilities on Freelance Mothers in Dance – PiPA

Funded by Dance Professionals Fund and conducted by Professor Angela Pickard, Canterbury Christ Church University, this qualitative study was based on focus groups and interviews with 40 freelance dancers and dance artists from different backgrounds and styles within the contemporary dance sector, working for established as well as smaller scale dance companies.

The report highlights the key findings of the PiPA study and builds on existing initiatives. It examines the physical and psychological challenges, particularly faced by freelance dance professionals who are mothers, affecting their career development, their sense of identity, and personal well-being.

Read the report here.

Cultural strategies and futures Report 2024 – University of Southampton

Cultural strategies and futures Report 2024 – University of Southampton

This report outlines findings and makes recommendations from the Public Policy Southampton funded project, Cultural strategies, compacts and futures: The role of local government in connecting culture with place, health and the environment. The project team of Professor Dan Ashton and Makanani Bell were based in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Southampton. The project was developed in partnership with the Southern Policy Centre and ran from January to June 2023.

This project aimed to understand how local government can effectively position culture in relation to priority issues such as place, health and the environment. As the project developed, a wider set of findings emerged exploring how cultural strategy documents are created, updated and shared. As such, the recommendations in this report focus on and suggest changes in the practice of commissioning and creating cultural strategies. The recommendations are relevant for any organisation (local authorities, culture trusts, Cultural Compacts, etc.) as they approach commissioning and creating cultural strategies and/or reflect on their continued purpose and value.

Read the report here

Culture, Climate and Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/23

Arts Council England Environmental Responsibility Report 2022/2023

Arts Council England (ACE) publishes its Environmental Responsibility Annual Report 2022-2023, a publication which presents National Portfolio Organisations (NPO) environmental data and narratives for the period of 1 April 2022 – 31 March 2023.

Report highlights include: 

  • 94% of funded organisations include environmental sustainability in core business strategies
  • 74% have programmed or produced work exploring environmental themes
  • Overall, there has been a 20% reduction in energy use across the portfolio over the last five years, and a 50% emissions reduction since reporting began in 2012.

Read the report here.

Seat at the Table 2024 Report – Women in ctrl – Feb 2024

Seat at the Table 2024 Report – Women in ctrl – Feb 2024

Historic News in the Music Industry! The ‘Seat at the Table 2024’ report is out now, marking a significant milestone with 52% representation of women on UK music trade body boards. Let’s celebrate progress and keep driving positive change together! #SeatAtTheTable

Key Findings:
52% of board members across UK music trade bodies are women, up from 32% in 2020.
16% of board members are women from a global majority background, up from 3% in 2020.
100% of the organisations featured have increased gender representation on their boards.
Over 55% of organisations have achieved 50% gender representation on their boards.

Read it here

Culture and creative industries: A catalyst for inclusive growth

Culture and creative industries: A catalyst for inclusive growth

Culture and creative industries have significant economic heft, contributing £160bn to the economy with 3.2 million jobs. The UK’s status as one of the top 5 exporters of creative services globally is central to its position on the world stage. Beyond this, culture plays a vital role in our day-to-day lives, shaping who we are as individuals and communities, and contributing to our wellbeing and pride in place. While many of our most internationally recognised cultural institutions are in the UK’s capital and other major cities, the social and economic impact of culture is everywhere.

Our framework sets out how culture and creative industries can catalyse inclusive growth. It includes three intersecting inclusive growth drivers and four enablers for making positive change happen.

Read the report here.